Jesus sayings from the Sermon on the Mount (the Marginal Mennonite version)

(Revised November 2011)

The Sermon on the Mount is defined as the 40+ sayings of Jesus found in Matthew 5, 6 and 7. About half of those sayings are considered by scholars to be non-authentic (meaning they were likely created by the early church rather than originating with Jesus). Non-authentic sayings are not included here. Most Sermon sayings have parallels in other gospels (Mark, Luke & Thomas). Sometimes the parallels are in simpler form, and thus probably closer to what Jesus actually said. Listed below are 21 of the most authentic Sermon sayings, along with Torah passages that Jesus probably had in mind when formulating them. Similar sayings from other traditions are offered as well.

Luke 6:20: “Congratulations, you poor! God’s kingdom belongs to you.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:3: “Congratulations to the poor in spirit! Heaven’s domain belongs to them.”

Thomas 54: “Congratulations to the poor, for to you belongs Heaven’s domain.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Isaiah 61:1-2: “He’s sent me to bring good news to the oppressed, to bind up the broken-hearted, to proclaim liberty to captives and release to prisoners, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor, and the day of God’s vengeance, to comfort all who mourn.”

Psalms 41:1: “Happy are those who consider the poor; the Lord delivers them in the day of trouble.”

Proverbs 14:21: “Those who despise their neighbors are sinners, but happy are those who are kind to the poor.”

Sayings from other traditions:

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 200: “Oh, with what ease we live, we who have nothing! We will become as the radiant ones, feeding on joy.”

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching 22: “Be broken to be whole. Twist to be straight. Be empty to be full. Wear out to be renewed. Have little and gain much. Have much and get confused.”

Luke 6:21b: “Congratulations, you who weep now! You will laugh.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:4: “Congratulations to those who grieve! They will be consoled.”

Torah passage behind the saying:

Psalms 126:5: “May those who sow in tears reap with shouts of joy.”

Luke 6:21a: “Congratulations, you hungry! You will have a feast.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:6: “Congratulations to those who hunger and thirst for justice! They will have a feast.”

Thomas 69:2: “Congratulations to those who go hungry, so the stomach of the one in want may be filled.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Isaiah 55:1: “Ho, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters. And you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.”

Psalms 146:5 & 7: “Happy are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the Lord their God … who executes justice for the oppressed, who gives food to the hungry.”

Luke 14:34-35: “Salt is good & salty. But if salt loses its zing, how will it be renewed? It’s no good for either earth or manure. It just gets thrown away.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:13: “If salt loses its zing, how will it be made salty? It then has no further use than to be thrown out and stomped on.”

Mark 9:50a: “Salt is good and salty. If salt becomes bland, with what will you renew it?”

Torah passage behind the saying:

Job 6:6: “Can that which is tasteless be eaten without salt, or is there any flavor in the juice of mallows?”

Matthew 5:14b: “A city sitting on top of a mountain can’t be concealed.”

Compare to:

Thomas 32: “A city built on a high hill and fortified cannot fall, nor can it be hidden.”

Torah passage behind the saying:

Isaiah 2:2: “In days to come the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be raised above the hills; all the nations shall stream to it.”

Matthew 5:15: “No one lights a lamp and puts it under a bushel basket, but on a lampstand, where it sheds light for everyone in the house.”
Compare to:

Luke 8:16: No one lights a lamp and covers it with a pot or puts it under a bed. Rather, one puts it on a lampstand, so that those who come in can see the light.”

Luke 11:33: “No one lights a lamp and then puts it in a cellar or under a bushel basket, but rather on a lampstand so that those who come in can see the light.”

Mark 4:21: “Since when is the lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket or under the bed? It’s put on the lampstand, isn’t it?”

Thomas 33:2-3: “After all, no one lights a lamp and puts it under a basket, nor does one put it in a hidden place. Rather, one puts it on a lampstand so that all who come and go will see its light.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Isaiah 42:6-7: “I have given you as a … light to the nations, to open the eyes that are blind, to bring out the prisoners from the dungeons, from the prison those who sit in darkness.”

Isaiah 49:6b: “I will give you as a light to the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.”

Luke 6:29: “When someone strikes you on the cheek, offer the other as well. When someone takes away your coat, don’t prevent that person from taking your shirt along with it.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:39-40: “Don’t react violently against the one who is evil. When someone slaps you on the right cheek, turn the other as well. When someone wants to sue you for your shirt, let that person have your coat along with it.

Torah passages behind the saying:

Isaiah 50:6: “I gave my back to those who struck me, and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard. I did not hide my face from insult and spitting.”

Proverbs 20:22: “Do not say ‘I will repay evil’; wait for the Lord, and he will help you.”

Lamentations 3:27 & 30: “It is good for one to bear the yoke in youth … to give one’s cheek to the smiter, and be filled with insults.”

Sayings from other traditions:

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching 63: “Strive not to struggle — achieve just by being. Savor the flavorless — value the unimportant. Meet unkindness with compassion.”

Buddha, Majjhima Nikaya 21.6: “If anyone should give you a blow with his hand, with a stick, or with a knife, you should abandon any desires and utter no evil words.”

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 5: “In this world hostilities are never appeased by hostility. But by the absence of hostility are they appeased. This is an ancient truth.”

Luke 6:30a: “Give to everyone who begs from you.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:42a: “Give to the one who begs from you.”

Torah passage behind the saying:

Deuteronomy 15:7-8: “If there is among you anyone in need, a member of your community in any of your towns within the land that the Lord your God is giving you, do not be hard-hearted or tight-fisted towards your needy neighbor. You should rather open your hand, willingly lending enough to meet the need, whatever it may be.”

Saying from other tradition:

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 224: “One should speak truthfully, one should not get angry; when asked, one should give, even if there is just a little. With these three traits, one would go in the presence of the radiant ones.”

Thomas 95:1-2: “If you have money, don’t lend it at interest. Rather, give it to someone from whom you won’t get it back.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:42b: “Don’t turn away from the one who tries to borrow from you.”

Luke 6:34-35a: “If you lend to those from whom you hope to gain, what merit is there in that? Even sinners lend to sinners, in order to get as much in return. But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Exodus 22:25: “If you lend money to my people, to the poor among you, you shall not deal with them as a creditor. You shall not exact interest from them.”

Leviticus 25:35-37: “If any of your kin fall into difficulty and become dependent on you, you shall support them. They shall live with you as though resident aliens. Do not take interest in advance or otherwise make a profit from them, but fear your God. Let them live with you. You shall not lend them your money at interest taken in advance, or provide them food at a profit.”

Matthew 5:44: “Love your enemies. And pray for your persecutors.”

Compare to:

Luke 6:27-28: “Love your enemies, do favors for those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for your abusers.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Exodus 23:4-5: “When you come upon your enemy’s ox or donkey going astray, you shall bring it back. When you see the donkey of one who hates you lying under its burden and you would hold back from setting it free, you must help to set it free.”

Leviticus 19:18: “You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against any of your people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Leviticus 19:34: “The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you. You shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.”

Deuteronomy 10:17-19: “For the Lord your God is God of gods, mighty and awesome, who is not partial and takes no bribe, who executes justice for the orphans and the widow, and who loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing. You shall also love the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”

Proverbs 24:17: “Do not rejoice when your enemies fall, and do not let your heart be glad when they stumble.”

Proverbs 25:21: “If your enemies are hungry, give them bread to eat. And if they are thirsty, give them water to drink.”

Sayings from other traditions:

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching 27: “The sage is good at helping everyone. For that reason there is no rejected person.”

Buddha, Sutta Nipata 149-150: “Just as a mother would protect her only child at the risk of her own life, even so, cultivate a boundless heart towards all beings. Let your thoughts of boundless love pervade the whole world.”

Matthew 5:45b: “God causes the sun to rise on both the bad and the good, and sends rain on both the just and the unjust.”

Compare to:

Luke 6:35d: “As you know, he is generous to the ungrateful and the wicked.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Psalms 145:9: “The Lord is good to all and his compassion is over all that he has made.”

Proverbs 29:13: “The poor and the oppressor have this in common: the Lord gives light to the eyes of both.”

Saying from other tradition:

Buddha, Sadharmapundarika Sutra 5: “That great cloud rains down on all whether their nature is superior or inferior. The light of the sun and the moon illuminates the whole world, both him who does well and him who does ill, both him who stands high and him who stands low.”

Luke 6:36: “Be merciful and compassionate, in the way your Father is merciful and compassionate.”

Compare to:

Matthew 5:48: “You are to be unstinting in your generosity in the way your heavenly Father’s generosity is unstinting.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Exodus 34:6b-7a: “The Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for the thousandth generation, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin.”

Deuteronomy 4:31a: “Because the Lord your God is a merciful God, he will neither abandon you nor destroy you.”

Luke 11:2b: “Father, your name be revered. Impose your imperial rule.”

Compare to:

Matthew 6:9b-10a: “Our Father in the heavens, your name be revered. Impose your imperial rule.”

Torah passage behind the saying:

Malachi 2:10a: “Have we not all one father? Has not one God created us?”

Matthew 6:11-12: “Provide us with the bread we need for the day. Forgive our debts to the extent that we have forgiven those in debt to us.”

Compare to:

Luke 11:3-4a: “Provide us with the bread we need day by day. Forgive our sins, since we too forgive everyone in debt to us.

Torah passage behind the saying:

Exodus 16:4a: “Then the Lord said to Moses, ‘I am going to rain bread from heaven for you, and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day.’”

Luke 6:37c: “Forgive, and you’ll be forgiven.”

Compare to:

Matthew 6:14-15: “If you forgive others their failures and offenses, your heavenly Parent will also forgive yours. And if you don’t forgive the failures and mistakes of others, your Parent won’t forgive yours.”

Mark 11:25: “And when you stand up to pray, if you are holding anything against anyone, forgive them, so your Parent in heaven may forgive your misdeeds.”

Matthew 6:19-21: “Do not acquire possessions here on earth, where moth or insect eats away & robbers break in & steal. Instead, gather your nest egg in heaven, where neither moth nor insect eats away & where no robbers break in or steal. As you know, what you treasure is your heart’s true measure.”

Compare to:

Luke 12:33-34: “Sell your belongings, and donate to charity. Make yourselves purses that don’t wear out, with inexhaustible wealth in heaven, where no robber can get to it and no moth can destroy it. As you know, what you treasure is your heart’s true measure.”

Thomas 76:3: “Seek his treasure that is unfailing, that is enduring, where no moth comes to eat and no worm destroys.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Isaiah 51:8: “For the moth will eat them up like a garment, and the worm will eat them like wool.”

Proverbs 23:4-5: “Do not wear yourself out to get rich. Be wise enough to desist. When your eyes light upon it, it is gone, for suddenly it takes wings to itself, flying like an eagle toward heaven.”

Sayings from other traditions:

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching 9: “Chase after money and security and your heart will never unclench. Care about people’s approval and you will be their prisoner. Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.”

Tao Te Ching 46: “The greatest evil: wanting more. The worst luck: discontent. Greed’s the curse of life.”

Tao Te Ching 70: “The sage wears rough clothing, and holds the jewel in his heart.”

Buddha, Khuddakapatha 8.9: “Let the wise person do righteousness: A treasure that others cannot share, which no thief can steal. A treasure which does not pass away.”

Instruction of Amenemope, ch. 7: “Toil not after riches. If stolen goods are brought to you, they remain not overnight with you. They have made themselves wings like geese. And have flown into the heavens.”

Matthew 6:24: “No one can be a slave to two masters. No doubt that slave will either hate one & love the other, or be devoted to one & disdain the other. You can’t be enslaved to both God & a bank account!”

Compare to:

Luke 16:13: “No servant can be a slave to two masters. No doubt that slave will either hate one and love the other, or be devoted to one and disdain the other. You can’t be enslaved to both God and a bank account.”

Thomas 47:1-2: “A person cannot mount two horses or bend two bows. And a slave cannot serve two masters, otherwise that slave will honor the one and offend the other.”

Saying from other tradition:

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 75: “There is one way for acquiring things, another leading to the unbinding. Knowing this, the practitioner, the disciple of the Buddha, should not take pleasure in honour. Let him foster detachment.”

Matthew 6:25-30: “Don’t fret about your life, what you’re going to eat & drink, or about your body, what you’re going to wear. There is more to living than food & clothing, isn’t there? Take a look at the birds of the sky. They don’t plant or harvest, or gather into barns. Yet your heavenly Parent feeds them. You’re worth more than they, aren’t you? Can any of you add one hour to life by fretting about it? Why worry about clothes? Notice how the wild lilies grow. They don’t slave & they never spin. Yet let me tell you: even Solomon at the height of his glory was never decked out like one of them. If God dresses up the grass in the field, which is here today & tomorrow is thrown into an oven, won’t She care for you even more?”

Compare to:

Luke 12:22-28: “That’s why I tell you: don’t fret about life, what you’re going to eat, or about your body, what you’re going to wear. Remember, there is more to living than food and clothing. Think about the crows: they don’t plant or harvest, they don’t have storerooms or barns. Yet God feeds them. You’re worth a lot more than the birds! Can any of you add an hour to life by fretting about it? So if you can’t do a little thing like that, why worry about the rest? Think about how the lilies grow: they don’t slave and they never spin. Yet let me tell you, even Solomon at the height of his glory was never decked out like one of these. If God dresses up the grass in the field, which is here today and tomorrow is tossed into an oven, it is surely more likely God cares for you, you who don’t take anything for granted!”

Thomas 36:1-2: “Do not fret, from morning to evening and from evening to morning, about your food, what you’re going to eat, or about your clothing, what you are going to wear. You’re much better than the lilies, which neither card nor spin.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Job 12:7-9: “Ask the animals, and they will teach you. Ask the birds of the air, and they will tell you. Ask the plants of the earth, and they will teach you. And the fish of the sea will declare to you. Who among all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this?”

Song of Solomon 6:2-3: “My lover has gone down to his garden, to the bed of spices, to browse in the gardens and to gather lilies. I am my lover’s and my lover is mine. He browses among the lilies.”

Sayings from other traditions:

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching 73: “The way of heaven doesn’t compete yet wins handily, doesn’t speak yet answers fully, doesn’t summon yet attracts. It acts perfectly easily. The net of heaven is vast, vast, wide-meshed, yet misses nothing.”

Tao Te Ching 81: “The sage does not accumulate things. He lives for other people and grows richer himself. He gives to other people and has greater abundance.”

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 92: “Like the path of birds in the sky, it is hard to trace the path of those who do not hoard, who are judicious with their food, and whose field is the freedom of emptiness and signlessness.”

Thomas 26:1-2: “You see the sliver in your friend’s eye, but you don’t see the timber in your own eye. When you take the timber out of your own eye, then you will see well enough to remove the sliver from your friend’s eye.”

Compare to:

Matthew 7:3-5: “Why do you notice the sliver in your friend’s eye, but overlook the timber in your own? How can you say to your friend, ‘Let me get the sliver out of your eye,’ when there is that timber in your own? You phony, first take the timber out of your own eye and then you’ll see well enough to remove the sliver from your friend’s eye.”

Luke 6:41-42: “Why do you notice the sliver in your friend’s eye, but overlook the timber in your own? How can you say to your friend, ‘Friend, let me get the sliver in your eye,’ when you do not notice the timber in your own? You phony, first take the timber out of your own eye, and then you’ll see well enough to remove the sliver in your friend’s eye.”

Torah passage behind the saying:

Leviticus 19:17: “You shall not hate in your heart any one of your kin. You shall reason frankly with your neighbor, or you will incur guilt yourself.”

Sayings from other tradition:

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 50: “Look not at the faults of others nor at what they do or leave undone; but only at your own deeds and deeds unachieved.”

Buddha, Dhammapada v. 252: “It is easy to see the faults of others, but difficult to see one’s own. The faults of others you sift like a husk, but conceal your own, like a deceitful gambler conceals a bad roll of the die.”

Matthew 7:7-8: “Ask, it’ll be given to you. Seek, you’ll find. Knock, it’ll be opened for you. Rest assured: everyone who asks receives, everyone who seeks finds, and for the one who knocks it is opened.”

Compare to:

Luke 11:9-10: “So I tell you: Ask, it’ll be given to you. Seek, you’ll find. Knock, it’ll be opened for you. Rest assured: everyone who asks receives, everyone who seeks finds, and for the one who knocks it is opened.”

Thomas 2:1: “Those who seek should not stop seeking until they find.”

Thomas 92:1: “Seek and you will find.”

Thomas 94:1-2: “One who seeks will find, and for one who knocks it will be opened.”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Jeremiah 29:13: “When you search for me you will find me, if you seek me with all your heart.”

Proverbs 8:17: “I love those who love me, and those who seek me diligently find me.”

Matthew 7:9-11: “Who among you would hand a child a stone when it’s bread they’re asking for? Again, who would hand a child a snake when it’s fish they’re asking for? Of course no one would! So if you know how to give your children good gifts, isn’t it much more likely that your Parent in the heavens will give good things to those who ask?”

Compare to:

Luke 11:11-13: “Which of you parents would hand your children a snake when it’s fish they’re asking for? Or a scorpion when it’s an egg they’re asking for? So if you know how to give your children good gifts, isn’t it much more likely that the heavenly Parent will give holy spirit to those who ask?”

Torah passages behind the saying:

Isaiah 49:15: “Can a woman forget her nursing child, or show no compassion for the child of her womb? Even these may forget, yet I will not forget you.”

Psalms 103:13: “As a father has compassion for his children, so the Lord has compassion for those who fear him.”

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The Sermon on the Mount in the Torah


Exodus

16:4a: “Then the Lord said to Moses, ‘I am going to rain bread from heaven for you, and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day.’” (see Matthew 6:11-12, Luke 11:3-4a)

22:25: “If you lend money to my people, to the poor among you, you shall not deal with them as a creditor. You shall not exact interest from them.” (see Thomas 95:1-2, Matthew 5:42b, Luke 6:34-35a)

23:4-5: “When you come upon your enemy’s ox or donkey going astray, you shall bring it back. When you see the donkey of one who hates you lying under its burden and you would hold back from setting it free, you must help to set it free.” (see Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27-28)

34:6b-7a: “The Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for the thousandth generation, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin.” (see Luke 6:36, Matthew 5:48)

Leviticus

19:17: “You shall not hate in your heart any one of your kin. You shall reason frankly with your neighbor, or you will incur guilt yourself.” (see Thomas 26:1-2, Matthew 7:3-5, Luke 6:41-42)

19:18: “You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against any of your people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself.” (see Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27-28)

19:34: “The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you. You shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.” (see Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27-28)

25:35-37: “If any of your kin fall into difficulty and become dependent on you, you shall support them. They shall live with you as though resident aliens. Do not take interest in advance or otherwise make a profit from them, but fear your God. Let them live with you. You shall not lend them your money at interest taken in advance, or provide them food at a profit.” (see Thomas 95:1-2, Matthew 5:42b, Luke 6:34-35a)

Deuteronomy

4:31a: “Because the Lord your God is a merciful God, he will neither abandon you nor destroy you.” (see Luke 6:36, Matthew 5:48)

10:17-19: “For the Lord your God is God of gods, mighty and awesome, who is not partial and takes no bribe, who executes justice for the orphans and the widow, and who loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing. You shall also love the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” (see Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27-28)

15:7-8: “If there is among you anyone in need, a member of your community in any of your towns within the land that the Lord your God is giving you, do not be hard-hearted or tight-fisted towards your needy neighbor. You should rather open your hand, willingly lending enough to meet the need, whatever it may be.” (see Luke 6:30a, Matthew 5:42a)

Isaiah

2:2: “In days to come the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be raised above the hills; all the nations shall stream to it.” (see Matthew 15:14b, Thomas 32)

42:6-7: “I have given you as a … light to the nations, to open the eyes that are blind, to bring out the prisoners from the dungeons, from the prison those who sit in darkness.” (see Matthew 5:15, Luke 8:16, Luke 11:33, Mark 4:21, Thomas 33:2-3)

49:6b: “I will give you as a light to the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.” (see Matthew 5:15, Luke 8:16, Luke 11:33, Mark 4:21, Thomas 33:2-3)

49:15: “Can a woman forget her nursing child, or show no compassion for the child of her womb? Even these may forget, yet I will not forget you.” (see Matthew 7:9-11, Luke 11:11-13)

50:6: “I gave my back to those who struck me, and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard. I did not hide my face from insult and spitting.” (see Luke 6:29, Matthew 5:39-40)

51:8: “For the moth will eat them up like a garment, and the worm will eat them like wool.” (see Matthew 6:19-21, Luke 12:33-34, Thomas 76:3)

55:1: “Ho, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters. And you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.” (see Luke 6:21a, Matthew 5:6, Thomas 69:2)

61:1-2: “He’s sent me to bring good news to the oppressed, to bind up the broken-hearted, to proclaim liberty to captives and release to prisoners, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor, and the day of God’s vengeance, to comfort all who mourn.” (see Luke 6:20, Matthew 5:3, Thomas 54)

Jeremiah

29:13: “When you search for me you will find me, if you seek me with all your heart.” (see Matthew 7:7-8, Luke 11:9-10, Thomas 2:1, Thomas 92:1, Thomas 94:1-2)

Psalms

41:1: “Happy are those who consider the poor; the Lord delivers them in the day of trouble.” (see Luke 6:20, Matthew 5:3, Thomas 54)

103:13: “As a father has compassion for his children, so the Lord has compassion for those who fear him.” (see Matthew 7:9-11, Luke 11:11-13)

126:5: “May those who sow in tears reap with shouts of joy.” (see Luke 6:21b, Matthew 5:4)

145:9: “The Lord is good to all and his compassion is over all that he has made.” (see Matthew 5:45b, Luke 6:35d)

146:5 & 7: “Happy are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the Lord their God … who executes justice for the oppressed, who gives food to the hungry.” (see Luke 6:21a, Matthew 5:6, Thomas 69:2)

Proverbs

8:17: “I love those who love me, and those who seek me diligently find me.” (see Matthew 7:7-8, Luke 11:9-10, Thomas 2:1, Thomas 92:1, Thomas 94:1-2)

14:21: “Those who despise their neighbors are sinners, but happy are those who are kind to the poor.” (see Luke 6:20, Matthew 5:3, Thomas 54)

20:22: “Do not say ‘I will repay evil’; wait for the Lord, and he will help you.” (see Luke 6:29, Matthew 5:39-40)

23:4-5: “Do not wear yourself out to get rich. Be wise enough to desist. When your eyes light upon it, it is gone, for suddenly it takes wings to itself, flying like an eagle toward heaven.” (see Matthew 6:19-21, Luke 12:33-34, Thomas 76:3)

24:17: “Do not rejoice when your enemies fall, and do not let your heart be glad when they stumble.” (see Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27-28)

25:21: “If your enemies are hungry, give them bread to eat. And if they are thirsty, give them water to drink.” (see Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27-28)

29:13: “The poor and the oppressor have this in common: the Lord gives light to the eyes of both.” (see Matthew 5:45b, Luke 6:35d)

Job

6:6: “Can that which is tasteless be eaten without salt, or is there any flavor in the juice of mallows?” (see Luke 14:34-35, Matthew 5:13, Mark 9:50a)

12:7-9: “Ask the animals, and they will teach you. Ask the birds of the air, and they will tell you. Ask the plants of the earth, and they will teach you. And the fish of the sea will declare to you. Who among all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this?” (see Matthew 6:25-30, Luke 12:22-28, Thomas 36:1-2)

Lamentations

3:27 & 30: “It is good for one to bear the yoke in youth … to give one’s cheek to the smiter, and be filled with insults.” (see Luke 6:29, Matthew 5:39-40)

Song of Solomon

6:2-3: “My lover has gone down to his garden, to the bed of spices, to browse in the gardens and to gather lilies. I am my lover’s and my lover is mine. He browses among the lilies.” (see Matthew 6:25-30, Luke 12:22-28, Thomas 36:1-2)

Malachi

2:10a: “Have we not all one father? Has not one God created us?” (see Luke 11:2b, Matthew 6:9b-10a)

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Suggested Reading

Funk, Robert W. and The Jesus Seminar, The Five Gospels: What Did Jesus Really Say? (HarperOne, 1996).
Hooper, Richard, Jesus, Buddha, Krishna, Lao Tzu: The Parallel Sayings (Sanctuary Publications, 2007).
Robinson, James M., The Gospel of Jesus: A Historical Search for the Original Good News (HarperSanFrancisco, 2005).
Weyler, Rex, The Jesus Sayings: The Quest for His Authentic Message (Anansi Press, 2009).

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Compiled by Charlie Kraybill on behalf of the Marginal Mennonite Society.

Visit the “Marginal Mennonite Society” page on Facebook, and “like” us.

E-mail Charlie: carlosnycity@gmail.com

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3 Responses to “Jesus sayings from the Sermon on the Mount (the Marginal Mennonite version)”

  1. John Ballard Says:

    This is excellent.
    Suggestion:
    I appreciate that the Anabaptist tradition leans against newfangled trappings but I would love to share this on Facebook with one of those handy little “Share” features.
    Perhaps the designated blog tech person can look into adding that to your blog.

  2. CharlieK Says:

    John,

    Glad you liked it. I do have a PDF uploaded at Scribd. From there I think you can share it on Facebook. Here’s the Scribd link:

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/66466453/Jesus-Sayings-From-the-Sermon-on-the-Mount

  3. Sam Says:

    have we considered putting some of this below the jump? This is a lot of info.

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